Lighting a garden well is an art. It is making a synthesis of landscaping using the most significant elements that compose it, imagining the use of spaces and creating scenes using different effects. To make it it is necessary to capture the spirit of the place and define what sensation we seek to create in the people who live it or contemplate it.

The garlands of lights, with two intensities (100% and 75%), are marketed 6 meters long per strip, which allows setting up scenes and situations quickly.  Number of lamps: 20. IP65, suitable for outdoor use.  (LitexLed).

The garlands of lights, with two intensities (100% and 75%), are marketed 6 meters long per strip, which allows setting up scenes and situations quickly. Number of lamps: 20. IP65, suitable for outdoor use. (LitexLed). (Inés Clusellas./)

This patio, a project by Carola Crostelli, proposes a simple but very versatile installation.  The luminaires are placed only on their perimeter walls, without elements that interpose, allowing the contemplation of the sky.  They illuminate downwards, so that there is no glare from windows and outdoor spaces.

This patio, a project by Carola Crostelli, proposes a simple but very versatile installation. The luminaires are placed only on their perimeter walls, without elements that interpose, allowing the contemplation of the sky. They illuminate downwards, so that there is no glare from windows and outdoor spaces. (Garden Archive /)

Artificial light has the ability to reveal and show everything, or it can make the eye see what we want it to see. Three experts on the subject, Sabrina mandel, architect, professor at the UBA and lighting designer; Ruben Amsel, designer of lighting and luminaires for exterior and landscaping, and Carola Crostelli, architect and specialist in visual environment and surface lighting, shared some tips with Jardín Magazine and here we gather the main aspects to take into account when lighting your outdoor space.

  • The sooner the electrical wiring is started on site, the fewer limitations will arise and there will be better chances of achieving goals proposed within the lighting project.
  • Before deciding what to light and how to do it, it is important analyze the view from the house, of existing trees, equipment, circulations, massifs and existing plants.
  • Try to illuminate what is necessary, that the lighting is controlled and does not produce glare.
  • The contrast of warm light versus cold light is a recurring resource, and it is interesting to make a good mix of both.
  • Try a suggestive lighting so as not to lose the spirit of the night, and not to dazzle.
  • In urban patios it is not advisable to illuminate the limits because the space is reduced. The ideal is to regulate the perimeter lighting, so that some of the limits are dark to highlight plants and tables light them from above.
  • Depending on the species, they can be lit from above, to cast shadows, but If the shape of the plant is very slender, it should be done from below.
  • Do not include the entire project in the same ignition. Create different scenes using effects.
  • In trees: it is always interesting to combine optics to achieve different effects depending on the morphology of the species. In very large trees, the luminaires must cover the entire shape so as not to deform it. This is done by having a good optical control of the luminaires, that is, that all the light that is emitted is directed to the glass without losing too much power along the way.
  • For the selection of outdoor luminaires, it is necessary to take into account that meet certain technical characteristics, such as the index of protection to the ingress of solids and liquids. It is also important that the electrical installation is carried out by suitable personnel and that they comply with current regulations.
  • It is convenient that the origin and source of light are concealed, so that the illuminated objects can be seen but not know from where or how.

To illuminate the trees, in a design by Rubén Amsel, TREE 80w luminaires were used.  They were combined with mixed beams: closed-angle optics to bathe the trunk and reach a greater height and open optics to bathe the width of the crown.  The option of combining optics to achieve different effects depending on the morphology of the tree is interesting.  In the foreground gallery, the blue light source was positioned in the line above, illuminating the black painted ceiling so that it reflects off the zinc sheet on the walls and the black sink that mirrors the blue.

To illuminate the trees, in a design by Rubén Amsel, TREE 80w luminaires were used. They were combined with mixed beams: closed-angle optics to bathe the trunk and reach a greater height and open optics to bathe the width of the crown. The option of combining optics to achieve different effects depending on the morphology of the tree is interesting. In the foreground gallery, the blue light source was positioned in the line above, illuminating the black painted ceiling so that it reflects off the zinc sheet on the walls and the black sink that mirrors the blue. (Courtesy Rubén Amsel /)

In an internal courtyard illuminated by Carola Crostelli, two spaces were proposed, one just to contemplate and the other passable.  In the rest space, the sculpture of Don Quixote was taken as the protagonist, illuminating it scenographically with artifacts from the floor, so that its projected shadow takes as much force as the sculpture itself.  The deck presents luminous cubes that organize the circulation.  At the perimeters, head-type luminaires nailed to the pots generate shadows at the limits of the patio, framing the space.  The concept of marking the limits with the luminaires in the perimeter pots is retaken and the sculpture that is the center of attraction from the elevator nucleus is emphasized.  (Developer: Ing. Diego Pereda. Landscape Architect: Lic. Marcela Augustoni).

In an internal courtyard illuminated by Carola Crostelli, two spaces were proposed, one just to contemplate and the other passable. In the rest space, the sculpture of Don Quixote was taken as the protagonist, illuminating it scenographically with artifacts from the floor, so that its projected shadow takes as much force as the sculpture itself. The deck presents luminous cubes that organize the circulation. At the perimeters, head-type luminaires nailed to the pots generate shadows at the limits of the patio, framing the space. The concept of marking the limits with the luminaires in the perimeter pots is retaken and the sculpture that is the center of attraction from the elevator nucleus is emphasized. (Developer: Ing. Diego Pereda. Landscape Architect: Lic. Marcela Augustoni). (Courtesy of Estudio Barrionuevo / Sierchuk /)

In this lighting project by Sabrina Mandel, the lighting covers both the horizontal surfaces (vegetation) and the vertical faces of the façade and the immediate environment that the landscape may have.  In this case, the smooth wall of the architecture's façade acts as a backdrop for the projection of the shadows generated by the illumination of the herbaceous bed, also creating a color contrast.  (KWZ Arquitectura y Desarrollos. Estudio Paisajismo, Lucía Schiappapietra and Teresa Rozados).

In this lighting project by Sabrina Mandel, the lighting covers both the horizontal surfaces (vegetation) and the vertical faces of the façade and the immediate environment that the landscape may have. In this case, the smooth wall of the architecture’s façade acts as a backdrop for the projection of the shadows generated by the illumination of the herbaceous bed, also creating a color contrast. (KWZ Arquitectura y Desarrollos. Estudio Paisajismo, Lucía Schiappapietra and Teresa Rozados). (Courtesy Camila Wolf./)



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