LN – Earth Day: “It is time to choose what type of consumer we are going to be”

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About 10 years ago, people began to talk about conscious and responsible consumption in Argentina. The word sustainability was written and repeated without knowing very well what it was about.

To be or not to be sustainable seemed to separate one from the other.

On the one hand, there were those interested in taking care of the land, the environment, the preservation of natural resources, the responsible use of energy and water. On the other, suspiciously, those who did not believe in any of this looked at it and thought that the planet could continue at the rate of extraction, logging and contamination.

Buying, throwing, buying undoubtedly had more strength than reducing, recycling and reusing.

The party had been winning consumerism by a landslide.

But a virus came to stop what seemed impossible.

And today we are all on the same side. All in equality in front of the possibility of infecting us. All without being able to leave home. All going back to cooking. All fighting for health.

From Brazil they are encouraged to declare: “We realized that we can live without soccer players, but not without farmers.” And I would add the importance of these farmers working under decent conditions, without being exposed to agrochemicals and receiving a fair payment for their work that benefits the entire community.

The time has come to make small producers visible

who work taking care of the land and people. It is time to take responsibility for the planet. To choose what type of consumer we are going to be: the one who runs to the supermarket in search of the ticket that allows him to circulate or the one who buys consciously and responsibly.

The tomato does not grow in the gondola. The tomato comes from the ground and on the ground is the farmer who with his daily work supports the food system. Trade is called to be fair and equitable. Just as access to food should be fair and equitable. And what’s more, healthy food.

“It is time to assume our responsibility with the planet. To choose what type of consumer we are going to be: the one that runs to the supermarket in search of the ticket that allows it to circulate or the one that purchases consciously and responsibly.”

The economy that is coming is local, of proximity and proximity. The kilometer zero of food is going to be the new ticket.

Short chains between producer and consumer are based on transparency and trust

. Soon we will choose those products that travel the shortest possible distance between their place of production and our table. And perhaps, those of us who have space, may even dare to produce our own food.

Now that health has risen to the top of our interests, we need to know that

health is intimately linked to food

. Hippocrates – the father of medicine – said it 2400 years ago: “Let food be your medicine and let your medicine be food.” Today more than ever, everything depends on us. Just as we returned to cooking as a family and as we lived through this quarantine, one day at a time. So change can come. It is time to ask ourselves who we are going to support with our purchase, what products we consider essential for our diet, how we are going to take care of our health from now on. In short, what power are we going to exercise with our money?

Let us know that when we buy from a producer who works taking care of the land and people, we are part of the new economy. And even more, if we plant our own food.

“It is time to ask ourselves who we are going to support with our purchase, what products we consider essential for our diet, how we are going to take care of our health from now on.”

The

green economy

it was introduced by the UN in 2008 as a response to the economic, energy, climate and food crisis in which humanity was plunged in the 21st century and, 12 years later, we are going to have to take it seriously. Why

when we get back on track, human well-being, social equity and caring for the environment have to be above all other good

. And because the only good that we should promote from now on is the common good.

(*) Angie Ferrazzini is a journalist, founder of the NGO Knows the Earth and Ashoka Fellow.

FURTHER

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Publicado en el diario La Nación