With two days to go until the historic vote on the bill to decriminalize abortion, it is anyone’s guess as to what will happen. What is certain however, is that the campaign to legalize abortion will have far-reaching cultural implications, whether the bill is passed or not.

One such manifestation of this cultural impact is Línea Peluda, a united collective of feminist illustrators at the front lines of Argentina’s abortion debate. A group that started spontaneously as an Instagram account for illustrators to share works inspired by the debate, it has now grown into a movement, bringing together over 700 artists from all over the country who are drawing for the right to choose.

The movement has also graduated from digital content to physical presence in the streets. Every Tuesday, they can be found illustrating and creating works to attach to the walls of the fences around Congress, surrounding the seat of Government with images calling for women’s right to decide.

Collectives such as this, which combine art with politics to create highly influential social movements, are pushing the abortion debate to the forefront of the nation’s consciousness, reaching new audiences through the power of social media. Even if the bill is not passed, the long-reaching ramifications of the debate and the mobilization that it has generated mean that the issue of abortion will never again be relegated back to the shadows.

By turning a political debate into a visual artistic movement, Línea Peluda is ensuring that the call to legalize abortion becomes more than just stuffy political jargon. These illustrators are creating dynamic and original images that will remain on the front lines of debate, uniting men and women from all over the country. Whatever happens in the coming days, collectives such as Línea Peluda are proof that the call for #AbortoLegalYa will only grow louder as they inspire more and more people to join the movement for the right to choose.





Publicado en Bubble.ar el
2018-06-11 12:04:21

Autor:
Emma Conn

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